In Auckland lecture Ban lauds New Zealands ingenuity and hard work for

It was the second visit for the Secretary-General to the University, which bestowed on him today an honorary doctorate in recognition of the valuable work being carried out by the Organization. In his lecture, Mr. Ban hailed New Zealand’s “ingenuity and hard work” for the UN, including the contribution of military and civilian personnel to its peacekeeping operations. “This country has been a long and staunch champion of nuclear and conventional disarmament,” he went on to say, adding his hope that with New Zealand’s ratification of the Arms Trade Treaty, it will come into effect by the end of this year.He also voiced appreciation for New Zealand’s contributions over the years to promoting security in Afghanistan, Timor-Leste, the Solomon Islands and Bougainville in Papua New Guinea.New Zealand is also a pioneer on gender equality as the first country in the world where women received the right to vote, the Secretary-General noted, saying he admired this “far-sighted vision.”The country, he continued, is a party to most of the core international human rights treaties, and its aid programme and assistance have been pivotal to helping countries in the Pacific region to develop. On a personal note, the Secretary-General recalled a programme organized by the American Red Cross Society that he participated in while in high school that sponsored him to travel across the United States with other young people from more than three dozen countries. “During that programme, Jocelyn Jones and Shirley Keen were representing New Zealand. We have met several times over the years, including three years ago when I was in Auckland. And I am happy that they are here with me today,” said Mr. Ban.Also today, Mr. Ban met with Sir Jerry Mateparae, Governor-General of New Zealand, and voiced his appreciation the country’s contribution to UN peacekeeping and significant support to the Third UN Conference on Small Islands Developing States. They also discussed New Zealand’s important role in the upcoming World Conference on Indigenous Peoples, to take place on the margins of the 69th General Assembly later this month, and exchanged views on developments in Ukraine, Iraq, the Middle East and South Sudan – subjects that the Secretary-General also discussed with Prime Minister John Key yesterday. read more

One in four adults have multiple health problems startling data finds

first_imgOverall, 30 per cent of women had multiple conditions, along with 24.4 per cent of men.More than half of GP visits and hospital admissions were found to be devoted to those with multiple conditions, and 79 per cent of prescriptions were issued to those with more than one complaint.Researchers said the shocking figures showed the need to redesign services to create “one stop shops” to treat patients more holistically.They said NHS systems – which fund hospitals for appointments to treat separate diseases – did not put the patient first, and wasted precious resources.Dr Duncan Edwards, a research fellow from Cambridge University, said: “The numbers are just startling when you see them in black and white.“The average person with diabetes has three or four other conditions, yet the NHS structures forbid looking after patients properly. We need a one-stop shop, not a system that thinks in terms of single diseases.” Prof Helen Stokes-Lampard, chairman of the Royal College of GPs said the research showed why GPs need longer with patients Credit:PA/Grainge Photography/Royal Colleg  “Chronic pain, high blood pressure and diabetes are some of the most common conditions, and all are fuelled by obesity – we are going to be seeing more and more of this in future,” he warned.Tam Fry, from the National Obesity Forum said too many people were eating “relentlessly” despite constant reminders about the number of diseases linked to excess weight.Professor Helen Stokes-Lampard, Chairman of the Royal College of GPs, said the research showed that family doctors need far more time with many of their patients.“This large-scale, comprehensive research is further evidence of the increasing complexity of cases that GPs are dealing with, and the inadequacy of the standard 10-minute consultation,” she said.The GP said the slots were not long enough for patients with complex needs, but said that attempts to give longer appointments meant others had to wait even longer to see a doctor. More than a quarter of adults in Britain have multiple health problems, according to a major study warning of “alarming” pressures being placed on the NHS.The research shows that the vast majority of GPs’ time is being taken up by patients with several conditions, with eight in 10 prescriptions now issued to patients with more than one health complaint.Researchers from Cambridge University said the trend was set to worsen, amid soaring rates of obesity fuel diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease.The four-year study of more than 400,000 adults in England found 27.2 per cent were suffering from more than one health condition – with even higher rates among women.  High blood pressure was the most common – with almost one in five patients found to be suffering from it. And one in ten patients were diagnosed with depression or anxiety, while one in ten had chronic pain.The research showed that overlaps between the diseases were common, with an average of three conditions each for those aged 75 and over. Dr Edwards said pressures were expected to deepen, given Britain’s rising obesity rates.Two in three adults are now overweight or obese, while three quarters of millenials are set to reach this point by the age of around 40, on current trends. Professor Helen Stokes-Lampard Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more