Yarmouth Residents to Benefit from Neighbourhood Improvement Initiative

first_imgFamilies in a Yarmouth neighbourhood are getting help to fix the exterior of their homes and revitalize their community. Housing Nova Scotia Minister Joanne Bernard was in Yarmouth today, Aug. 11, to announce more than 180 homes in the south end of town are eligible for grants to improve curbside appeal. The program is part of Housing Nova Scotia’s Neighbourhood Improvement Initiative. “People need to feel good about their surroundings. It is key to building vibrant and healthy neighbourhoods and it’s more than bricks and mortar,” said Ms. Bernard. “We are committed to working with our partners to create innovative solutions, and this is a great example of building healthy, vibrant communities.” The improvements will complement work by the Town of Yarmouth. Homes within the designated area — Williams and Forbes streets to the east, Kempt Street and Marshall Lane to the south, Water Street to the west, and Haskell and Albert streets to the north — may be eligible for grants of up to $3,000 for projects such as landscaping, exterior painting and some repairs. Landlords may qualify for $2,000 grants per unit, which they have to match. The municipality has helped bring vibrancy to the neighbourhood with improvements such as new decorative lighting on South Main Street, underground services and paving. It also plans to: “The Town of Yarmouth is thrilled to welcome and support this program,” said Mayor Pam Mood. “The process of revitalization goes so much deeper than beautification, it brings communities together, instills a sense of pride and generally enhances the quality of life for residents. We’re excited to see the outcomes on every level.” Partnerships with private developers help draw on the strength of the community. Andrew Cameron and his father Gordon have built two developments with Housing Nova Scotia, creating eight units. “It’s important that everyone has access to a home — a place they are safe in, they feel proud of and they can afford,” said Mr Cameron. “The south end is a historically significant part of the town and I believe this partnership will be the turning point that will help reinvigorate this neighourhood.” Denise Vacon is a public health promoter with the Nova Scotia Health Authority and a member of CHOICE, a group of community members committed to improving safe, accessible and affordable housing options in Yarmouth County. “We are very excited to hear that the Town of Yarmouth will be benefiting from the Neighbourhood Improvement Initiative. Improving physical infrastructure is a key factor to quality of life, health and social well-being,” Ms. Vacon said. “This initiative will enhance an already strong sense of community pride, create momentum and engage residents to be part of a project that will have many positive impacts.” Housing Nova Scotia staff will deliver applications over the next few weeks to homes in the area. They are also available online at —–www.housingns.ca . add box culverts on Argyle Street at Broad Brook to handle increased runoff from storms introduce an updated sign bylaw to help create a more historical downtown feeling to the commercial area approve a new public parking lot in the south end, across from the Red and White storelast_img read more

Applications for US unemployment benefits fall to 319000 a sign of steady

Applications for US unemployment benefits fall to 319,000, a sign of steady job market by Christopher S. Rugaber, The Associated Press Posted May 8, 2014 6:56 am MDT In this April 22, 2014 photo, Bryan Preston of Hannaford supermarkets, left, talks with job seekers during a job fair at Columbia-Greene Community College in Hudson, N.Y. The Labor Department reports the number of people who applied for unemployment benefits last week on Thursday, May 8, 2014. (AP Photo/Mike Groll) WASHINGTON – The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits fell 26,000 last week to 319,000, the latest sign that the job market is slowly improving.The drop follows two weeks of increases that reflected mostly temporary layoffs around the Easter holiday. The holiday can cause an uptick in layoffs of bus drivers, cafeteria workers and other school workers during spring break. Those earlier increases caused the four-week average of applications, a less volatile number, to rise 4,500 to a seasonally adjusted 324,750.With the impact of the holiday fading, applications are returning to pre-recession levels. The average fell in early April to 312,000, the fewest since October 2007. The recession officially began in December 2007.“Through the volatility, the data remain encouraging,” said Jim O’Sullivan, chief U.S. economist at High Frequency Economics.The four-week average of applications is down from an average of 343,000 for all of last year, O’Sullivan noted. That is “consistent with the pick-up in employment growth” that’s taken place this year, he added. Monthly job gains have averaged 214,000 from January through April, up from 194,000 in 2013.Applications are a proxy for layoffs, and so the decline suggests that companies are cutting fewer jobs. That trend is typically followed by more hiring, though the relationship is not always exact.About 2.69 million people are receiving benefits, 76,000 fewer than in the previous week. That figure has fallen nearly 11 per cent in the past year. An additional 1.3 million people lost benefits when an emergency program that had provided up to 47 extra weeks of aid expired at the end of 2013.Employers have stepped up hiring in recent months. The economy gained 288,000 jobs in April, the most in 2 1/2 years, the government said last week.In addition, the unemployment rate plunged to 6.3 per cent from 6.7 per cent. But that drop occurred because fewer people looked for work. The government doesn’t count people as unemployed unless they are actively searching.The improved hiring should help boost economic growth for the rest of this year.The economy barely expanded in the first three months of the year, growing at an annual rate of just 0.1 per cent. That was largely because a brutal winter kept consumers away from shopping malls, shut down factories and discouraged home and car sales.But many signs suggest that the economy has rebounded since then as the weather has warmed. Most analysts estimate that the economy is growing at a healthy annual pace of about 3.5 per cent in the current April-June quarter. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more